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Guns, Germs and Steel

Where to Watch Guns, Germs and Steel

3
Into the Tropics
2005-01-01
Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book and national best seller, Guns, Germs, and Steel is an epic detective story that offers a gripping expose on why the world is so unequal. Professor Jared Diamond traveled the globe for over 30 years trying to answer the biggest question of world history.

Watch Guns, Germs and Steel Season 1 Episode 3 Now

2
Conquest
2005-01-01
Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning book and national best seller, Guns, Germs, and Steel is an epic detective story that offers a gripping expose on why the world is so unequal. Professor Jared Diamond traveled the globe for over 30 years trying to answer the biggest question of world history.

Watch Guns, Germs and Steel Season 1 Episode 2 Now

1
Out of Eden
2005-01-01
Based on Jared Diamond's Pulitzer Prize-winning book and national best seller, Guns, Germs, and Steel is an epic detective story that offers a gripping expose on why the world is so unequal. Professor Jared Diamond traveled the globe for over 30 years trying to answer the biggest question of world history "Why is the world so unequal?

Watch Guns, Germs and Steel Season 1 Episode 1 Now

Guns, Germs and Steel is a compelling documentary series from National Geographic, based on the 1997 Pulitzer-Prize winning book of the same title by Jared Diamond. Aired in 2005, this three-part series aims to explain why Eurasian civilizations, not African, Native American, or other civilizations, have survived and conquered others.

The documentary series grapples with the big questions of human history, incorporating both macro and micro perspectives, exploring topics ranging from the historic development of cultures to biological considerations. Hosted by Diamond himself, a renowned physiologist and geographer, he uses a diverse array of disciplines including anthropology, genetics, ecology, and linguistics, unfolding a grand narrative about the rise and fall of civilizations that challenges conventional assumptions about humanity's development and progress.

In the first part of Guns, Germs and Steel, titled "Out of Eden", Diamond discusses the concept of geographical luck. He argues that civilization isn't due to racial or cultural differences. Instead, Diamond suggests that environmental factors have shaped the destiny of civilizations. The first episode examines the disparities of power and technology between human societies, tracing it back to the very early beginnings of civilization. Diamond guides viewers through his comprehensive theory about the unequal distribution of resources, effectively demonstrating how geographical and environmental conditions favored some groups and disadvantaged others, impacting the development of agriculture and, by extension, societies themselves.

The second episode, named "Conquest", continues to analyse the reasons for the differences between societies that arose from the development of agriculture. One of the central concepts Diamond explores in this episode is how societies with an advanced technological level, and diseases to which they have developed immunity, can overcome other, less advanced societies. He brings the viewers to the scenes of the pivotal Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire to explore the roles of guns, germs, and steel in global domination.

In the final part, "Into the Tropics", Diamond extends his geographical luck thesis into an analysis of the continents. He scrutinizes how environments influenced the development of societies and civilizations in different regions and continents, focusing on how geographical, climatic, and ecological factors contributed to the disparity in technological advancement and societal development.

While the narrative of Guns, Germs and Steel is serious and intellectual, its delivery is viewer-friendly, relying on accessible language, vivid graphics, and stimulating visuals from a variety of global locations. Diamond's investigations take him around the globe: from the Andes and Amazon rainforest where Inca civilizations once thrived, to the African savannahs, Asian paddy fields, and Polynesian islands. These stunning locations, coupled with the series' high production values, make it both visually and mentally stimulating.

Moreover, throughout the series, interviews with contemporary individuals who live traditionally or scholars studying these areas add depth and credibility to Diamond’s thesis. He pushes viewers to think deeply about the complex web of factors that have shaped our world, encouraging an understanding of history that goes beyond the simple narrative of winners and losers.

While some historical purists might balk at the grand simplification that Diamond's thesis provides, there's a certain elegance to his theory, and the very fact that it stirs up debate makes Guns, Germs and Steel worth watching. It's a provocative reframing of world history, and the adaptations made for television have given rise to a documentary that is both ambitious and approachable.

Overall, Guns, Germs and Steel is a fascinating, thought-provoking series that encourages viewers to look differently at the world and to consider the numerous, often unseen factors that have shaped human history. It's a must-watch for those interested in history, anthropology, sociology, or anyone who's curious about why the world is the way it is.

Guns, Germs and Steel is a series categorized as a . Spanning 1 seasons with a total of 3 episodes, the show debuted on 2005. The series has earned a moderate reviews from both critics and viewers. The IMDb score stands at 7.5.

Channel
National Geographic
Rating
7.5/10
Cast
Peter Coyote, Jared Diamond
Guns, Germs and Steel is available on .