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Possession

Where to Watch Possession

R
1981

Possession is a 1981 horror-thriller cinéma vérité drama, directed by maverick filmmaker Andrzej Zulawski. This avant-garde psychological thriller boasts a series of impressive performances, in particular from French actress Isabelle Adjani and New Zealand actor Sam Neill, who play the tormented couple Anna and Mark. Margit Carstensen also stars in this film, underscored by the visceral theme of insanity. Set in the divided city of Berlin during the Cold War, the film's bleak, unsettling atmosphere is accentuated by the backdrop of grim concrete structures and spartan cityscapes, reflecting the binary world of the protagonists. The crux of the film revolves around the crumbling marriage of Anna and Mark, a narrative triggering an exploration of intense themes skirting the boundaries of sanity. Isabelle Adjani, in her award-winning role as Anna, truly takes the audience on a rollercoaster ride of emotions. Her conscience-stricken ambivalence between her roles as a mother, a wife, and her concealed individuality, layers her character with complex emotional dynamics. With a mercurial mood that switches from poised serenity to flares of rabid hysteria, Adjani's performance is riveting and terrifying in equal measure. Sam Neill essays the role of Mark, a spy who returns from a business trip only to find his wife, Anna, demanding a divorce. Tormented by the sudden deterioration of his marriage and his wife's intense, erratic behavior, Mark veers between baffled devastation and stoic determination. Neill's portrayal of Mark lays bare the acute helplessness of a man unmoored by the disintegration of his marriage and the descent into what appears to be insanity of a woman he deeply loves. In the midst of this marital maelstrom, Margit Carstensen plays Helen, a doppelganger of Anna. Her character's mysterious presence adds a compelling layer of intrigue, suspense, and ambiguity to the plot line. Zulawski’s Possession is not merely a tale of a marriage gone wrong. The film transcends the confines of horror and drama, offering more than a smattering of existential dread and dark absurdism. Its underpinnings reveal the deconstruction and annihilation of a relationship; an exorcism of the ordinary, transgressing into the realm of extraordinary. The film's macabre storyline is rendered even more unsettling by Zulawski’s striking visuals. His idiosyncratic command of the camera results in a series of extraordinary long takes and violent, disorienting tracking shots. This, in conjunction with the hauntingly eerie soundtrack, creates a disconcerting fusion of sight and sound, propelling the narrative through a wild ride of visceral emotion and psychological horror. Right from its debut, Possession has continued to be a subject of intense debate and scrutiny. It is a film intricate in its exploration of identity, duality, metamorphosis, and psychological trauma, interspersed with elements of body horror. This movie ceases to be a mere spectator experience and transforms into a discomforting path into existential probes. The film’s complexity is intensified by the dual narrative perspective. It portrays the psychological tumult of the protagonists from both their viewpoints, thereby leading the audience through a labyrinth of fear, anxiety, and existential dread. The allegorical undertones of social, political, and personal distress vis-à-vis the setting of Berlin, marked by the infamous wall, also adds a dimension of real-life horror to this masterpiece. The city's divided state mirrored Anna and Mark’s collapsing relationship, making the backdrop a metaphorical canvas of the central plot. In conclusion, Possession is a fiercely original and profoundly disturbing film, an intense cinematic experience that revels in its ability to challenge viewers' comfort zones. Part psychological horror, part grotesque love story, it is a film that continually shifts between reality and hallucination, personal breakdown, and horror. The film's potent performances, particularly Adjani's, coupled with its distinctive visual style, makes Possession a visceral cinematic concoction of horror, drama, and suspense.

Possession is a Horror movie released in 1981. It has a runtime of 97 Mins, Edited, 123 Mins, Director's Cut. Critics and viewers have rated it moderate reviews, with an IMDb score of 7.3. It also holds a MetaScore of 75.

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Where can I stream Possession movie online? Possession is available to watch and stream, buy on demand, download at Amazon Prime, Apple TV Channels, The Roku Channel, Kanopy, Amazon. Some platforms allow you to rent Possession for a limited time or purchase the movie for downloading.

7.3/10
75/100
Director
Andrzej uawski
Stars
Isabelle Adjani, Sam Neill
Genres
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